Capt. J Swaab was one of the “Essington Air Group,” the "War Birds ”, trained at Chandler Field, in Essington.

Lts. Murray E. Tucker, John C. Crissey and Jacque Swaab pose directly behind an !-Flight Spad XIII 4601 #2.
As Commander of ‘B’ Flight, 22nd Aero Squadron, Capt. Swab finished the War with 10 confirmed and up to another 7 unconfirmed Victories. He was highest scoring pilot of 22nd Aero and 2nd Pursuit Group to which 22nd was attached:
1 08 Sep 1918 1235-1305 22nd SPAD XIII Two-seater Cirey-Saarburg
2 08 Sep 1918 1235-1305 22nd SPAD XIII Fokker D.VII Cirey-Saarburg
3 08 Sep 1918 1235-1305 22nd SPAD XIII Fokker D.VII Cirey-Saarburg
4* 28 Sep 1918 0840 22nd SPAD XIII Fokker D.VII Ivoiry
5 23 Oct 1918 1140 22nd SPAD XIII (S7640) Fokker D.VII Thernogues
6 23 Oct 1918 1210 22nd SPAD XIII (S7640) Rumpler C Thernogues
7 27 Oct 1918 1540 22nd SPAD XIII Fokker D.VII Sommerance
8* 27 Oct 1918 1540 22nd SPAD XIII DFW C Champiegneulle
9* 29 Oct 1918 1620 22nd SPAD XIII Fokker D.VII Aincreville
10 31 Oct 1918 1555 22nd SPAD XIII LVG C E of Verdun

(Victories 4, 8 and 9 were shared with another pilot.)

After the war Swaab settled in Manhattan and job hopped, variously working as an executive for Fleer, then a cigar manufacturer, a women’s garments firm, and as a business consultant. He was technical advisor on Howard Hawks’ 1930 film, the original Dawn Patrol with Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., although a lot of sites state Swaab worked on the 1938 version.

He was an early member of Cross and Cockade and the main speaker at the August 17, 1962 meeting.
He died a year later of heart trouble and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery, his squadron mate Ray Brooks present along with other notables including General Carl Spaatz.

Swaab flew a Spad XIII with the bore the name ‘Mayer II’ beneath the cockpit in honor of his
Father and a star for each victory placed round the units comet insignia.